Clyde Steamer Espresso Blend

Regular price Sale price £9.00

Clyde Steamer Espresso Blend

Regular price Sale price £9.00
Shipping calculated at checkout.
Fruit
Chocolate
Rich

Our award-winning house espresso blend delivers a full-bodied coffee with bags of character. This blend is seasonally changing, but always delivers rich chocolate and nutty flavours.

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Description

Clyde Steamer is a full bodied blend for espresso and is perfect paired with steamed milk. Its name is a nod to the paddle steamers that used to bring holidaymakers ‘doon the watter’ to Argyll.


Please note that images are representative of packaging, and may not represent the current blend of Clyde Steamer, which changes seasonally, whilst maintaining the flavour profile you love. The current composition of this blend is provided in the information below. 

Farm:

Rio Brilhante

Processing:

Natural

Owner:

Inacio Carlos Urban

Region:

Cerrado

Varietal(s):

Acaia, Catuai

Altitude:

1,050 metres above sea level

Town:

Coromandel

Made up of 55 separate counties, the region of Cerrado Mineirocan be found to the east of Minas Gerais, one of the primary coffee-growing regions of Brazil. Famed for its quality coffee production, the region ranges from 1,000 to 1,250 metres above sea level, providing ideal conditions for coffee production due to the perfect balance of wet and dry seasons. Cerrado alone is estimated to produce as much as 12.5% of Brazil’s total coffee output and has now received origin status, meaning only coffee from Cerrado can be called ‘Cerrado’, similar to Champagne in France. This exceptional quality is noted to result from a combination of climate, soil, terrain and the general know-how of its people, something Inacio is proud to be a part of. Inacio originally named his farm Rio Brilhante, translating in English as ‘bright river’, to honour the clear crystal water that provides life to his farm. The high level of quality found at Rio Brilhante can be attributed to the standard of cultivation. Both the soil and coffee tree leaves are analysed every quarter. Using these results, corrections are made using specific products and fertilisers. Pruning is conducted on average every two years when crops begin to reduce in productivity. Trees are evaluated by a trained professional, with precision cuts made either at the lateral (secondary branches), neckline (upper part of the plant) or reception (total cut of the plant). Cherries are picked and sorted, before being taken to the patios. Here, coffee cherry is spread into thin layers, where it left to dry for around 23 days, or until a moisture of 12% or lower is reached. Rio Brilhante takes part in a number of social projects; their main being ‘Seeds of Change’, a programme focused on helping Rio Brilhante staff to learn skills such as reading, writing and calculating in everyday life. The driving force behind this scheme is that staff are constantly being faced with new challenges, both at work and home, in our modern world. Seeds of Change helps to give staff the tools they need, to be able to thrive under such circumstances. Members of staff who take part receive a professional qualification, to help further their career. Rio Brilhante also offers this project to staff member’s relatives, highlighting the importance of the family as one of their core values. As well as Seeds of Change, other education initiatives such as ‘Escolinha Tia Edna’, a disability school for 85 pupils aged 2-6, and ‘Ponto do Livro’, a project aimed at opening local open-air libraries, are also funded by Rio Brilhante.

Farm:

Finca El Retiro del Quisaya

Processing:

Fully washed

Owner:

Arabigos del Sur, S.A.

Region:

Chimaltenango

Varietal(s):

Bourbon, Pache

Altitude:

1,800 metres above sea level

Town:

San Martin Jilotepeque

Finca El Retiro del Quisaya was established 100 years ago by the Ortega family and was recently sold to the Arabigos del Sur organization. The name of the farm comes from a river that runs within the land. This fantastic coffee brings notes of milk chocolate and citrus to Clyde Steamer.

Farm:

Finca San Antonio

Processing:

Anaerobic Natural

Owner:

Maria Felícitas Mairena de Günkel

Region:

Matagalpa

Varietal(s):

Parainema

Altitude:

1,100 metres above sea level

Town:

El Arenal Nature Reserve, Isabelia Mountain Range

High in the Matagalpa region amidst the misty Isabelia mountain range sits Finca San Antonio. The Günkel Mairena family has been growing coffee for 46 years on Finca San Antonio with Maria Felícitas Mairena de Günkel currently running and managing the 79 hectares of coffee-producing land today. The farm executes excellent environmental standards, with most of the coffee being grown under shade within agroforestry systems. 45% of the farm is protected as El Arenal Nature Reserve, housing one of the few intact portions of the cloud forest in Nicaragua. In 2001, the farm was even declared a private wildlife Reserver
Roaster's Notes Clyde Steamer
We love the challenge of continually tweaking and elevating our house espresso blend and, right now, it’s up there with our best. Brazil Douradinha is our go-to for chocolatey, nutty notes that give your espresso its depth of flavour, Guatemala Retiro del Quisaya lends a milk chocolate sweetness with hints of lemon, whilst the naturally processed Nigaragua Finca San Antonio adds just a touch of fruitiness and acidity, to cut through the milk and give your brew a bit of zing.
About Brazil
Smuggled into Brazil in 1727 by a Portuguese soldier, after seducing a Governor's wife in French Guiana, around 40% of all coffee in the world is produced in Brazil - around 3.7 million metric tons annually - making it the powerhouse of world coffee production.

Typically, Brazil naturally processes its coffee, but has recently started to experiment with washed and pulped lots.

Brazilian coffees are usually associated with sweet caramel and chocolate notes, big bodies, and a relatively low acidity.
About Nicaragua
After a century of boom, Nicaragua's coffee industry was hit by setback after setback as political upheaval, a US-backed rebellion, hurricanes, drought, and a devastating financial crash all took their toll.

The last couple of decades have been kinder to Nicaragua though, with a growing focus on quality and traceability resulting in some excellent coffees.

Caturra and Bourbon varieties, harvested from December to March, are generally recognised for their complex, fruit flavours, and bright acidity.
About Guatemala
Coffee took off in Guatemala in the 1850s, in the rush to find a new crop to replace the collapsing indigo trade. By 1880, it represented 90% of Guatemala’s exports, but wild growth resulted in the displacement of indigenous peoples, tipping the country into a civil war over issues related to land distribution, poverty, hunger and racism, which rumble on even now.

Today, the country ranks in the top 15 coffee producers, with Bourbon, Typical, Caturra and Catuai beans harvested between December and April.

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